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Caribbean Cooking
 CaribbeanChoice : Food, Cooking & Dining : Caribbean Cooking
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Citizen Eve
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Quote Citizen Eve Replybullet Topic: National Dishes .. Best of Diaspora
    Posted: 16 Jan 2008 at 6:43am


Grenada's national dish is Oiled Down!

Grenada's national dish is called "oil-down". It a simple, delicious and robust dish, which is very popular in local restaurants. It's a hearty one-pot meal (think stew) of salted meat, chicken, dumplings, breadfruit, callaloo ((KAL-la-loo) - made from young dasheen leaves) and other vegetables. The whole thing is stewed in coconut milk, herbs and spices to add even more flavor. Saffron gives this dish an exquisite element.

You will need:
8 oz. salt meat
1 large or 2 small breadfruit, cut into 4 or 6 sections
8 oz. cooked salt fish, flaked
1 whole chili
2 sprigs thyme
2 chives
1 stick celery, chopped or 1/2 teaspoon celery seeds
2  3/4 pints coconut milk
salt

This dish must be made in the spirit of love and nurture.
Soak meat overnight in cold water, drain. Remove the breadfruit core and peel. In a saucepan, put alternate layers of breadfruit, callaloo, meat and fish. Tie chili, thyme and chives together and add to the pan with celery and coconut milk. Cover tightly and bring to the boil, reduce heat and simmer for about 45 - 50 minutes until everything is cooked and tender. When cooked the liquid should all be absorbed and the stew oily. Remove herbs before serving and add salt to taste.
Enjoy and give thanks to the ancestors.


"the time is always ripe to do right", Nelson Mandela.
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caymanian
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Quote caymanian Replybullet Posted: 16 Jan 2008 at 4:51pm
we call something here but made with fish, coconut dinner and in Jamaica they call it rundown. you have not tasted tropical till you taste these dishes.
I have an idea the Taino (Arawack) are the folks who started this dish,


Edited by caymanian - 16 Jan 2008 at 4:54pm
I'm alive, it's a good day.Cel
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Quote Citizen Eve Replybullet Posted: 16 Jan 2008 at 11:59pm

You are right caymanian ... to really experience authentic Caribbean food one must taste the local traditional dishes ... they are the best ... I could see the Arawak as origin, they used the local spices to preserve.

Do you have a recipe unique to an island that you would like to share ... we'd love that Wink

Whats your favorite seasoning caymanian?
"the time is always ripe to do right", Nelson Mandela.
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Quote caymanian Replybullet Posted: 18 Jan 2008 at 2:11pm
I must admit my seasoning that I love is Pimento leaves(allspice) ginger, scallion(some call it spring onions But they are different) thyme and of course scotch bonnet pepper.
 I must admit I love rice and peas, I love simple dishes such as fish roasted over open coal with pimento leave, ackee and codfish, jerk pork, pepper pot soup, stew peas and rice.
there are so many dishes that I enjoy. i had a dish in Belize made from cornmeal and chicken that was fantastic, there are so many.
last night i had a very interesting time with a young Grenadian girl who is an certified accountant here, we talk about the culture of the Caribbean islands , she is like my self much traveled with in the Caribbean, so we talked till late night. it was refreshing, she like myself did not like dance hall music and the trashy music coming out of the reggae world.
I'm alive, it's a good day.Cel
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Citizen Eve
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Quote Citizen Eve Replybullet Posted: 19 Jan 2008 at 9:38am

Caymanian, with your cooking expertise and travels you are well equipped to write a very good cook book ... have you ever thought about it?

I use thyme, garlic and chives in just about everything cooked in my home ... they are my favorites ... I like saffron too. I notice my Jamaican friends use a lot of pimento and ginger, but I don't ... what kind of dishes do you use it in? Grenada as you know is the Spice Isle so we do have access to a wide variety of spices ... family send all the time.

Ackee I've grown to love but we never touched it when I was growing up in Grenada!

Rice and peas is popular in our home too ... do you put meat in your stew peas ... we do ... care to share your recipe? I agree that simple foods really allow you to appreciate the flavors better ... they are authentic.

Tell me more about the Belize dish with cornmeal and chicken ... what do you put in it ... sounds yummy.

A Grenadian girl in the Caymans ... I think I know who she is!

Yeah, I know what you mean about the current trends in  Caribbean music ... who are your all time favorites music wise ?

Lovely chatting with you Caymanian ... have a wonderful day.

"the time is always ripe to do right", Nelson Mandela.
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Quote caymanian Replybullet Posted: 19 Jan 2008 at 3:37pm

Stew Peas

2 cups red peas
1/2 lb salt beef
1 lb stew beef (you also can use pigstail if you like)
1 scotch bonnet pepper
2 stalk escallion
3 sprig thyme
2 cups coconut milk(mix according to direction.wether its can or box)
6 pimento seed
3 cloves garlic
salt and pepper to taste
spinners or small dumplins (just flour and water) I like to put potatoes in it also this automatically thickens it.

boil and drain salt beef , (or soak overnight to get rid of some of the salt)in a medium size bowl place peas,meat and garlic,boil until peas is tender about 1 1/2 hour,add coconut cream,spinners,and seasoning,cook for about an hour,taste,adjust seasoning if need thicken mix 3 tablespoon flour with 1/4 cup water strain in stew,boil until thicken serve with rice.

I'm alive, it's a good day.Cel
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Quote Citizen Eve Replybullet Posted: 20 Jan 2008 at 4:56am

Thanks Caymanian for the recipe ... I've never had it with salted meat ... am sure it will be good ... I will keep you posted.

Your Christmas cake recipe turned out superb ... great really ... stewing the fruits was an excellent suggestion with the limited time, really blended the fruits to perfection ... now we have adopted a new tradition and thanks for taking my black cake to another level!
I was not ambitious enough to attempt the icing ... next time I plan to try.




Edited by Citizen Eve - 20 Jan 2008 at 4:56am
"the time is always ripe to do right", Nelson Mandela.
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Quote Citizen Eve Replybullet Posted: 26 Jan 2008 at 12:12pm

Ackee and Salt fish - The Jamaica National Dish

Ackee & Salt fish is the national dish of Jamaica. Typically, Ackee is eaten as a breakfast entree. Seldom is it eaten alone ... usually served with boiled green bananas or fries bakes. While it is often eaten most times during the week, it is considered a Sunday treat.

INGREDIENTS :

  • 1/2 lb. Salt fish (codfish)
  • 1 dozen ackees or an 8 oz can
  • 1 small onion
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • 3 slices hot scotch bonnet pepper
  • 1 small red sweet pepper
  • cooking oil

METHOD:

  1. Soak Salt fish in warm water to remove excessive salty taste.
  2. After soaking salt fish (codfish), place it in cold water and boil.
  3. Clean the achee. Remove the seeds and all traces of interior red pit from the ackees.
  4. Wash ackees five times
  5. Cover and boil until moderately soft.
  6. Drain, cover, and put aside.
  7. Pick up (flake) the salt fish and remove all bones.
  8. Sauté  thinly sliced onions and sweet pepper rings.
  9. Remove half of the fried onions and peppers
  10. Add salt fish and the ackees, and turn the fire/stove up slightly.
  11. Add black pepper
  12. Pour in to serving plate and garnish with remaining onions and pepper slices
  13. Enjoy



Edited by Citizen Eve - 26 Jan 2008 at 12:19pm
"the time is always ripe to do right", Nelson Mandela.
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Quote Citizen Eve Replybullet Posted: 26 Jan 2008 at 12:28pm

Steamed Flying Fish

by Anne-Marie Whittaker

Steamed Flying Fish and Coo-Coo is the national dish of Barbados. No visit to that island would be complete without a taste of this treat.
These fishes, which grow to around 15 inches long, live on the surface of the ocean and do not actually fly. They leap into the air and spread their enlarged pectoral fins allowing them to glide over the ocean's surface with recorded distances of over 600 feet. However, the normal distance is around 30 feet.

Yield: 4 servings

Ingredients:
  • 8 flying fish fillets
  • 3 limes
  • 1 tbs salt
  • 3 tbs Barbadian Seasoning
  • 1 large onion sliced
  • 6 cloves garlic minced
  • 1 green bell pepper cut in julienne strips
  • ˝ oz fresh thyme
  • ˝ oz fresh marjoram
  • 1 tsp parsley chopped
  • 1 large tomato chopped
  • 1 tsp limejuice
  • 2 cups water
  • ˝ tsp hot pepper sauce
  • ˝ tsp curry powder
  • 3 tbs margarine
  • seasoned salt to taste

 

Steamed%20Flying%20Fish%20and%20Coo-Coo%20picture
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Method:
Rub the fish with the juice of the limes and the salt and leave to stand for 10 minutes.
Rinse the fish and pat dry with paper towels, then rub in the Barbadian Seasoning. Roll each up (like a sausage) and secure with a toothpick.
Heat the margarine in a saucepan and sauté the onion and garlic for 3 minutes, or until the onions become transparent. Add the tomato and parsley and continue to cook for a further 2 minutes. Tie the thyme and marjoram together and add to the pan together with the remaining ingredients - except the fish. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Add the fish and continue to simmer for 10 minutes.

Serve with Coo Coo.

More recipes by Anne-Marie Whittaker

Ms. Anne-Marie Whittaker's website: Native Treasures


Edited by Citizen Eve - 26 Jan 2008 at 12:30pm
"the time is always ripe to do right", Nelson Mandela.
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Quote harmac Replybullet Posted: 27 Jan 2008 at 1:36pm
i had some yesterday my Bajan friend he is the master of CoCo, but we had it with Grouper fillet he stuffed the fish with shallots and thyme,and tomatoes then add a little butter cover and steam . boiled sweet potatoes to go with it. Girl! it was served with Mount Gay and ginger beer , and to top it off. (we had a similar thing called ducono (blue draws) in jamaica) with a sweet potatoe pone.now that was West Indian.

Edited by harmac - 27 Jan 2008 at 1:40pm
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