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Citizen Eve
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Quote Citizen Eve Replybullet Topic: Grenada ... My Home & Native Land
    Posted: 06 Jan 2010 at 10:53pm

Grenada
has a wealth of interesting places to visit and so here  are just a few of my favourites ... enjoy





The market at St Georges is a noisy, colourful and fragrant experience not to be missed. The best day to visit is Saturday as this is when you will find it at it's purest & busiest. There is always a bewildering array of not just Nutmeg, but a huge number of other locally grown spices such as cloves, ginger, vanilla, cinnamon, and mace, along with many fruits and local produce.























With Grenada being such a lush tropical island there are of course some beautiful waterfalls to be found. The most well known being Concord Falls ( see right ) and Annandale Falls ( see left ). In reaching these waterfalls you will drive through some stunning scenery.






Grenada
's Fedon Mountain & Concord Falls

eco05.jpg%20%2819207%20bytes%29Advanced hikers and trekkers should not fore go the opportunity to take these two more substantial hikes, which link to the Mt. Qua Qua Trail in Grand Etang. The Concord Falls trail branches off from the Mt. Qua Qua Trail after about an hour, leading down through rain forest canopy, over hilltops and gurgling brooks, to bring you to the triple cascades of the Concord Falls. The lowest of the three is a very popular swimming area, camping spot, and tourist attraction, with modern facilities surrounding its generous swimming area. The upper falls, about twenty minutes' hike up the river, are definitely worth the short walk, as they are much less visited and even more beautiful. The 40 ft/12 m cascade plunges down through the thick vegetation to an inviting pool that offers a much more tranquil swim than you will find at the lower falls. The third and uppermost of the three cascades of Concord Falls lies considerably higher up the mountain and requires about two hours further hiking. Branching off from the Concord Falls Trail before it reaches the cascades is the short but demanding path leading up to the cave-like recess of Fedon's Camp. The camp was the strategic base of Julien Fedon, a Grenadian of French origins who led a slave uprising against the British in 1765. This well-maintained but arduous trail takes you deep into the very heart of the Grand Etang rain forest, through shady groves mahogany, teak, and many of Grenada's other tree species. Giant ferns and bird life abound here, including the green-throated Carib and the yellow-billed cuckoo.
A guide is recommended for both the Fedon's Mountain and the Concord Falls treks.
My most favorite of all the Grand Etang mountain range ... it is our history and culture and piece of eden ... quite an experience ... a very difficult trail and always wet ... rains all the time there. Maria am sure your remember some interesting expeditions there ... literally walked with our behinds ... my mother's cooler must be still up there!!!



Grenada The Isle of Spice ... Dougladston Estate will certainly give you a glimpse into spice kingdom ...

grenada%20dougladston%20estate The Dougladston Estate is just outside Gouyave, about two thirds of the way 'up' the Island as you go up the west coast from St. George's. Just before you enter the fishing town of Gouyave, there is a bridge. And immediately before the bridge, a right turn. (Sorry to make you do all that reversing.)
If you take this right turn, you will immediately wish you hadn't. The road has seen better decades, and would make an excellent testing ground for industrial strength suspension systems.
grenada%20spice%20estateThe road is short, however, and there is every incentive, comfort apart,for going slowly. An impressive area of callaloo (the stuff that lookslike rhubarb but tastes like extremely nice spinach) on the right. (If you are self catering, do boil your callaloo: it cannot be eaten raw.)Some odd trees on the left have lost their bark. No: actually, they  were designed that way: they are pimento trees, aka 'allspice', because the berries taste of a mixture of nutmeg, cinnamon and cloves. And there are bananas galore, leading up to, and then down from, a little bridge.
A boucan is a building with huge drying trays on rails,so that the trays can be pushed under the building if it rains, and both pushed under and locked up at night, for security. What is on the drying trays depends on the time of year: it may be mace, cocoa,cinnamon, pimento, cloves... (But not nutmeg, which is not dried in the direct sun.)
spice%20estate%20insideInside the building, you will be led to a table where you will be invited to 'scratch 'n sniff' the leaves of a succession of twigs(warning: you need more than two hands to do justice to all the different leaves) and guess what the different spices are. You will then be told in some detail how the various spices are harvested and processed, and what they are used for.There will almost certainly be some that you do not know. Tonka beans, maybe, and sapote. And there are some impostors: cocoa, hardly a spice, is there, and indeed therei s an adjacent building, seldom visited, where cocoa beans used to be processed using steam technology. Many of the spices will be in  Calabash shells, excellent and practical bowls. And then there are loofah 'sponges', which are not sponges at all, but the fibrous interior of a cucumber. And that mysterious little bottle that is passed around for all to sniff. It is not too difficult to guess what is in it, but what is it used for? No, it's not my job to tell you here. Look up, and see the bamboo canes with double blades at the end,used for cutting down cocoa pods.
spicesDougaldston has seen better days. You will certainly be sharing the room with some bats. Dougaldston is a major slice of this Island's history. If you have time, gravitate to the back, and you will discover the offices and the ledgers where records of spices bought and sold in the early 20th century were kept. Ask to see the steam powered cocoa processing building, with its asbestos clad boiler, its steam powered drill for maintenance of the steam technology, and the first,small-scale, attempt at a nutmeg oil distillation plant.
If you want to buy spices, this is an opportunity to do so. You will normally find plastic bags containing cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg, mace and bay leaves for (at the time of writing) $US2. All fresh, and not ground: that way, they keep longer. And this is one of the places where you can buy cocoa balls: grate them over hot water, add milk and sugar,and you have 'cocoa tea'. Or use them to give a chocolate flavour to ice cream and in baking.
spicesDougaldston will introduce most of Grenada's spices to you, and will leave you pondering the past and present realities of life of those whose living depends / depended on this branch of agriculture which is so peculiarly Grenadian.
Edited by Citizen Eve - 2008 May 25


Grenada's Carib's Leap, or Leapers Hill
Directly north of the town of Sauteurs is a steep cliff face that descends vertically into the sea for more than 100 feet. It was from the top of the cliff that Grenada's last remaining Carib Indians hurled themselves in 1651, preferring suicide to domination by the French.
Talk about mass suicide and fierce sense of independence ...
Edited by Citizen Eve - 2008 May 25 at 8:49pm










Grenada's River Antoine Rum Distillery
No other distillery in the entire Caribbean has been in operation as long as River Antoine, and very few have so carefully maintained traditional methods of rum preparation. Although the distillery is privately owned, it does permit guided tours. Visitors can watch as rum is made in much the same manner that it was in the 18th century, when it fired the throats of the real buccaneers.
Edited by Citizen Eve - 2008 May 25 at 4:48pm


Fort George is another Grenada special ...
Fort George is situated on an elevated peninsula that commands the harbour entrance, a position that has given the fort enormous strategic importance since the French constructed it in the first decade of the 18th century. Although it continues to serve as the police headquarters, Fort George is most appreciated today for the views that it offers to sightseers. Much of its elaborate colonial structure remains intact, and part of the pleasure of a visit is rambling around among the passages and stairs of the ancient stone fortifications. Fort George still maintains a battery of old cannons, which are used on special occasions to fire off a resounding salute. In the 1980s, Fort George once again played a prominent role in Grenadian history as the site of the assassination of Maurice Bishop, along with several members of his cabinet. In 1983, the fort was bombed by American troops.
Edited by Citizen Eve - 2008 May 25 at 4:47pm







Grenada's Grand Etang Lake and Forest Reserve
The most popular area in Grenada for hiking and trekking is undoubtedly the rain forest around the Grand Etang Forest Reserve, high up in the mountains of the island's interior. Grand Etang's varied elevations and terrains maintain several different ecological subsystems, culminating in the elfin woodlands high up the slopes of the reserve's central Mona%20monkeymountains. The focal point of the forest reserve is Grand Etang Lake, which fills the crater of one of the island's extinct volcanoes. The rain forest around the lake holds a stupendously rich diversity of flora and fauna. Colorful tropical birds, tiny frogs and lizards, and rare orchids punctuate the dense rain forest vegetation, and the trails meander around the area's stunning waterfalls as well as the azure waters of Grand Etang Lake.
Grand Etang's flora includes towering mahogany and giant gummier trees as well as a multitude of ferns, tropical flowers, and other indigenous plants. The lush vegetation provides shelter for a wide variety of animals, particularly for the island's many species of birds. The broad-winged hawk (known here as the gree-gree), Lesser Antillean swift, Antillean euphonia, purple-throated Carib, Antillean crested hummingbird (known as the little doctor bird), and the Lesser Antillean tanager (known as the soursop) are all common sights. In addition, the Grand Etang is populated by plenty of frogs and lizards, as well as playing host to opossums, armadillos, mongooses, and the mona monkey.
Hikes at Grand Etang range from easy 15-minute jaunts to rigorous expeditions of several hours. The trails are quite good, and the Forest Reserve provides excellent guides (both written and human).

For the adventurous and outdoor  enthusiast ... a hike  would be breath taking and memorable.

Edited by Citizen Eve - 2008 May 25 at 4:46pm





Grenada's Sister Islands:

No trip to Grenada is complete without a trip to Carriacou (left) or Petit Martinique. Both islands lie immediately to the North of Grenada and are utterly peaceful. A day trip is a good idea and the Osprey  Express provides a state-of-the art ferry service from Grenada plus organized day trips. Carriacou & Petit Martinique are noted for their natural beauty, wonderful views and friendly people - the  archetypal small Caribbean island atmosphere.
It is a step back in time ... the culture is exceptional and our African influence very prevalent.
Edited by Citizen Eve - 2008 May 25 at 9:01pm

St George's is Grenada's picturesque Capital city
It is wrapped around the perimeter of the island's finest natural harbor, is perhaps the most appealing capital city in the entire Caribbean. Founded in the early 18th century by the French, St. George's still possesses something of the character of a French town, particularly in the red tile roofs and pastel colors of its traditional architecture. St. George's contains a number of sites worth exploring such as ...

Carenage
St. George's ideally-formed inner harbour is--as it has been for the last three centuries--the centre of marine activity on the island. The Carenage serves as an anchorage for every sort of vessel imaginable, from small fishing boats and elegant yachts to great white cruise ships. A walk along the encircling Wharf Road allows a lovely view of the harbor and its bounty of colorful ships.
St. George's Roman Catholic Cathedral
The Gothic tower of St. George's, though modest enough, is the most visible landmark in the city. Built in 1818, the tower lends Grenada's capital a distinctively European character.
House of Parliament
Across Church Street from the cathedral are two of St. George's most venerable buildings. York House, purchased in 1801, houses the House of Representatives, the Senate, and the Supreme Court. Along with the neighboring Registry, which was built in 1780, York house is a graceful example of early Georgian architecture.
explor02.jpg%20%2826778%20bytes%29 Market Square
Bustling, noisy, and colorful, the market is the center of the capital's civic life, as it has been for the last two hundred years. It is the main site for the purchase and sale of local produce, as well as the focal point for parades, political speeches, and religious activities. More recently, it has become the starting point for minibuses to the outer areas of the island. No visitor to Grenada should miss the Saturday morning market.
The Esplanade
Just down Granby Street from Market Square is the Esplanade, which looks out to the west across the Caribbean. A fine locale for an evening promenade.
Grenada National Museum
Although the National Museum is not large, it houses a fascinating collection of artifacts from Grenada's cultural history. Its collection extends from ancient times to the present, including material and exhibits on everything from the Carib to the political events of the 1980s.
Sendall Tunnel
This 340-foot tunnel, still the most convenient connection from the Carenage to the Esplanade, was rightly considered a technological triumph when completed the early 18th century. It is named for the island's governor at the time.
explor03.jpg%20%2821522%20bytes%29 Fort George
Fort George is situated on an elevated peninsula that commands the harbor entrance, a position that has given the fort enormous strategic importance since the French constructed it in the first decade of the 18th century. Although it continues to serve as the police headquarters, Fort George is most appreciated today for the views that it offers to sightseers. Much of its elaborate colonial structure remains intact, and part of the pleasure of a visit is rambling around among the passages and stairs of the ancient stone fortifications. Fort George still maintains a battery of old cannons, which are used on special occasions to fire off a resounding salute.
In the 1980s, Fort George once again played a prominent role in Grenadian history as the site of the assassination of Maurice Bishop, along with several members of his cabinet. In 1983, the fort was bombed by American troops.
Fort Frederick
Perched atop Richmond Hill at the center of St. George's, Fort Frederick is a smaller and more recent complement to the imposing Fort George. Built by the British, it was completed in 1791, during the French Revolution.

All of the above may be done easily in a walk around ... remember we are only 133 square miles big!!
Edited by Citizen Eve - 2008 May 25 at 4:39pm


Oh the beaches ... Grenada's beaches are paradise for real ... from all white sand (those on Caribbean Sea) to jet black sand(those on Atlantic Ocean) ... they are all worth the experience ...

There are about 45 beautiful beaches in Grenada, one of the islands most attractive features, and which most visitors come just to enjoy.
By law, All beaches on the island are officially public property, which means  that the public must have access to it, regardless of where it is situated ... talk about 'power of the people' ... was enacted after our infamous revolution.
Before property can be developed, especially areas which are located near a beach, the developer must show how he is providing access in case someone wishes to go there.There are no legal 'clothing optional' beaches in Grenada!!


Grand Anse Beach

Grand Anse Beach is 2 miles of white sand in a sheltered bay, and is a favorite of many visitors and probably the most popular.It is heavily featured in advertisements about the island, and several major hotels are located next to it.It is considered to be one of the loveliest beaches in the world.As the beach is on the western (leeward) side of the island, it is usually well sheltered and calm, and is a favorite with both locals and visitors alike.Grand Anse beach has a lot to offer, from water sports and scuba diving shops, to the vendors market and several good restaurants.So, if you are looking for a beach with attractions, then this is the one for you.
Available at the beach:
Many Restaurants & Hotels, Small Bars, Watersport & Scuba dive centers, Beach Chair Rentals, Vendors market, easily accessible by bus& water taxis.

Personally I find it too commercial and crowded ... but great if you want to show off your great body!!
Edited by Citizen Eve - 2008 May 26 at 1:59am

Secluded Beaches

There are also other nice, more secluded beaches around Lance Aux Epines and St. David's.Most of them are a little way off the beaten path and are only accessible with a four wheel drive vehicle.Also If you take a drive up the east coast, in just about every bay,you will find several more isolated secluded beaches  you can visit,even a few black sand beaches. The only difference between this type of beach and the normal white sand variety is the color. White sand usually consists of broken and pulverized coral, while black sand primarily consists of ground up rock. The texture is almost the same,with the black sand beaches being found usually at the outflow of rivers.

La Sagesse Beach

Ideal for a family outing, La Sagesse beach is in a sheltered bayand has a large expanse of silver sands. Quite shallow along the shore,it is nearly always very calm and is a favorite for families on the weekend. Also the home of the Restaurant and Resort 'La Sagesse Nature Resort'

Bathway Beach

Thenext most popular beach, especially on weekends, is located at Bathwayi n the north-eastern part of the island. Bathway Beach is mainly frequented by people who live in this part of the island, and is particularly popular because of a sheltered area where non-swimmers can bathe in relative safety. Taking the western main road will also enable you to visit the many beaches along that coast, and those tend to be a lot more accessible.This beach is on the Atlantic coastline, and therefore for some months of the year, the water is fairly choppy.
This  is one of my most favorite although it is usually quite rough ... the atmosphere is unreal and it is favored by the locals who do not care for the immense crowds.

Levera Beach

Levera Beach

This beach is located slightly further north than Bathway beach, but is accessible via the same road. With a great view of Sugarloaf island,situated a couple of hundred yards offshore, this beach is usually deserted as the road to it is very rough. If you are considering visiting it, a four wheel drive vehicle would be advisable.

Sauteurs Beach

This is a nice white sand beach, located on the northern coast of Grenada,just to the west of the town of Sauteurs.Usually deserted, this beach is easily accessible by road and is a nice destination for anyone planning an island tour. While it is not as popular as the Bathway and Levera Beaches, it is still a beautiful beach to relax on and boasts wonderful views of the islands to the north.
"the time is always ripe to do right", Nelson Mandela.
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Quote Citizen Eve Replybullet Posted: 06 Jan 2010 at 10:56pm
Did this for a friend who was traveling there for the first time ... thought I'd posted on CC but could not locate in search ... 
"the time is always ripe to do right", Nelson Mandela.
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Quote sandra Replybullet Posted: 06 Jan 2010 at 11:17pm
Wow! Beautiful, CE. I'm crazy about rivers and those waterfalls....Mmmmmm. I just want to be there right now. Our islands are so beautiful. I envy thos who remained and braved it. Now, some of them are in even a bette position than most of us who left for greener pastures.
I asked for all things so that I might enjoy life; I was given life so that I might enjoy all things
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Quote Citizen Eve Replybullet Posted: 06 Jan 2010 at 11:24pm
So true Sandy ... my oldest sister is testament ... from what I see with family members and friends ... those back home are doing better ... it is a pipe dream as they say this immigration business ... I go to New York and see how some of my peers live and they were definitely better off back home ...
The place is paradise all things considered ... I plan to spend more time there in near future ...
"the time is always ripe to do right", Nelson Mandela.
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Quote sandra Replybullet Posted: 07 Jan 2010 at 7:00am
Sometimes we only realize what we left behind when others are appreciating it. I'm pining for the rivers and forests back in Dominica.
I asked for all things so that I might enjoy life; I was given life so that I might enjoy all things
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Quote Citizen Eve Replybullet Posted: 07 Jan 2010 at 12:26pm
Grenada's geography is a lot like Dominica's ... very hilly with lush green vegetation ... naturally beautiful and serene and peaceful ...
One of my best buddy here is male friend of mine from Dominica ... we chat a lot ... he swears in patois when he gets mad ... LOL
"the time is always ripe to do right", Nelson Mandela.
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Quote sandra Replybullet Posted: 07 Jan 2010 at 3:43pm
There are a lot of Dominicans in Canada. They migrated to England and Canada. British all the way. Maybe your friend is on Dominican Diaspora.... I'm a member.
Then I'd love Grenada, then. Any West Indian island with rivers, mountains, lush foilage, that's home for me. I'm sure you have breadnuts there also, CE. Mon, I absolutely LOVE breadnuts.

Edited by sandra - 07 Jan 2010 at 3:46pm
I asked for all things so that I might enjoy life; I was given life so that I might enjoy all things
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Quote Citizen Eve Replybullet Posted: 11 Jan 2010 at 11:22pm
Yeah I love breadnut ... not too many are familiar with it ... some of his family here did come via England ... I will have to ask him if he's familiar with Dominican Diaspora ... he loves to 'ole talk and he is very funny ... I share my breadnut with him ... says his wife moves to the guest room as it make him fart stinky!!
"the time is always ripe to do right", Nelson Mandela.
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Quote sandra Replybullet Posted: 12 Jan 2010 at 1:25am
Where do you get breadnut in Canada? I so much trouble finding it here. I'll be getting some this week. My friend's brother or uncle will be visiting from Dominica. She asked him to bring some for me. I done have the pot on the stove waiting to drop them in.

People say the have that gas problem when they eat breadnuts. I don't. They have weak stomach from eating all that junk food.

I'm sure he's familiar with DD - that is if he's computer literate. Nearly all Dominicans in Canada and England are on that site.
I asked for all things so that I might enjoy life; I was given life so that I might enjoy all things
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Quote Citizen Eve Replybullet Posted: 12 Jan 2010 at 1:36am
Girl when I go home I return with two suitcases of all food and a list with explanation for immigration officers ... LOL ... and no problem ... everything declared ... even have fresh sorrel in the freezer and cornfish ... is that how you spell it ... my vocabulary has gone to the dogs ... and of course my asham and guava cheese ... and now I savor periodically ... 
"the time is always ripe to do right", Nelson Mandela.
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